Just as new experiences recall lessons learned over lifetimes, attending events like the Grand National Roadster Show allows us to expand our automotive creativity through rare reviews of past greatness. (It should be noted that the Grand National Roadster Show wasn't always the "Grand," as it was called the National Roadster Show from inception until the early '60s. It was also affectionately referred to as the Oakland Roadster Show, with many old timers still referring to it by this nameplate, but "Oakland" was never the official name).

Displaying some of the most cherished automotive expressions of our time, an impressive display entitled "Twice In a Lifetime" brought together a building full of memorable machinery shaped by some of the greatest car fabricators in history. Ranging from truly whimsical expressions of imagination, to beautifully functional drag cars and lakesters, to daily-driven street rods, this array of famous machinery offered something special for those who appreciate our most historic rides.

This celebration of amazing imagination, craftsmanship, and style called attention to numerous notables who have been making this hobby special since it began. Among them were special displays including impressive groupings of cars representing two of the hobbies most creative individuals we've recently lost-Lil' John Buttera and Boyd Coddington. These two men often worked closely in rethinking cars as we know them, and each made an indelible mark on our memories. Add in several impressive club gatherings of well-known cars that still rule the roads and there's no question this trip back in time influenced car enthusiasts for decades to come.

Named America's Most Beautiful Roadster in 1951, Carter Fisher's rebuild of Reco Squaglia's '23 T roadster recalls great times in American history when cars were simple, terrifyingly fast, inexpensive, and priceless in their return on investment.