Jack Walker
Ford Model A roadster
St. Charles, Missouri

Jack Walker started on his roadster project back in 1960, and he is now 78 years old. He currently lives with his wife, Diana, in St. Charles, Missouri, and he began working on his Model A at the same time his friend, Bill Burnham, was busy building his 1929 roadster, nicknamed "Ol' Blue". Bill and Jack were both early members of the Goodguys organization, and Jack was a representative for 15 years. Another friend of Jack's, Mike Kuhl, built the engine and transmission combo for the hot rod before Mike left St. Louis to open Kuhl Engineering in California, and the drivetrain consists of a 1954 Olds motor backed to a four-speed Hydramatic trans. And though Jack had a stroke in 2009 and isn't able to work on his ride any longer, he does still cherish the cars he has.

Gord McKenzie
1934 Plymouth
Lincoln, California

Gord McKenzie purchased this 1934 Plymouth coupe in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, for only $600. Of course that was back in 1965, and he has since hauled the car from Toronto to Santa Clara and finally to Lincoln, where he started an upgrade program four years ago.

He bought an SRT8 6.1 Hemi and NAG1 five-speed, but found the trans wouldn't shift without a sensor signal from the rear wheels. Being a true hot rodder, Gord designed and fabricated a trigger wheel that mounted between the driveshaft and the trans that mimicked the required input for the PCM. Dolphin and Classic Instrument gauges are found inside and House of Kolor paint on the outside.

Bob Furnad
1929 Ford roadster
Covington, Georgia

Built in the style of a 1960s-era hot rod, Bob Furnad's Model A is channeled far over an original 1932 Ford frame, and it uses a chopped Deuce grille shell as well. Painted Electric Yellow by Harold Bradshaw and pinstriped by Larry West, the 1929 rolls on American Racing Torq-Thrust D wheels wrapped in wide whites. Disc brakes (from Sheppard Race Cars) are found on each corner, and a 1956 Chevy 265 motor built by Travis Dominy sits up front. Topped with triple Holley 94 carbs and an Offenhauser intake, the engine also boasts a COMP camshaft and electronic ignition. Stewart-Warner gauges are found on the dash and a black interior (with pleated bucket seats) perfectly contrasts the exterior color.

Chet Jackman
1934 Plymouth
Sagle, Idaho

Lots of work went into Chet's Plymouth, including a 3-inch channel job as well as a chop (2 inches in the back and 2.5 inches in the front). A '33 Plymouth roof was used for its lower lines, and an insert was filled using a 1978 Chevy Celebrity roof section. The rear was bobbed 2 inches and the doors use hidden hinges and a kit from Specialty Power Windows. More than 100 square feet of Dynamat insulation was used in the coupe, and a 1,000-watt Rockford Fosgate helps pump out the tunes. The 270 Hemi engine came out of a 1955 Dodge Royal, and is equipped with a reground cam from Hot Heads. A Hot Heads transmission adapter was also used for the 700-R4 trans, and a 525 Demon Carb feeds the beast. Out back is a chromed and polished Jag rearend, and the coupe rolls on 15x5 ET wheels up front and 18x10 Boyd wheels in the rear.

Johnny Wimer
1929 Ford coupe
Monroe, Virginia

This is a first-time build for Johnny, and he's very happy with the way his coupe turned out. The body is chopped 2 inches and channeled 4. Pete's Body Shop in Madison Heights, Virginia, did the bodywork, and Scott Stinnett painted the car using PPG's Oh So Sexy Red three-stage candy paints. Inside a set of Dolphin gauges tell Johnny what's going on, and Gary Elder was able to incorporate a Glide Engineering split-back seat when creating the interior for the five-window using tan-colored material from Moore and Giles Leather Company in Lynchburg. Johnny also wanted a Ford engine in his Ford coupe, and opted for a 302 topped with an Edelbrock Performer induction system. After a three-and-a-half-year build, the rod was topped off with a set of 15-inch American Torq-Thrust II wheels.

Ken Nelson
1947 Ford coupe
Beloit, Washington

Hot rodders always have a great story about their first car, and Ken Nelson has a good one. Back in 1962 he and two buddies (Tom Doll and Roger Foss) all chipped in $5 to buy a 1946 Ford for a grand total of $15 and took timed turns racing around the perimeter of Ken's family hay field. By the end of the summer, Tom and Roger's $5 was returned to them and Ken drove the car in his last year of high school. Sometime later he picked up a 1947 coupe and recently got it on the road, about 19 years after he first bought it. Floors and rockers were replaced with Bitchin Products pieces and a new Ford engine and five-speed trans were installed by Hopperstad Rod and Custom.

Want to see your vehicle in Early Iron? Email a good photo (at least 1 MB in size) and a paragraph telling us about you and the car to: Early Iron at eric.geisert@sorc.com. We'll consider all entries.