Updated 11/07/06

HAWAII

Reconstructed vehicle: a vehicle that is registered to be operated on a public highway, and that is:

(1) Assembled from new or used parts by a person other than a recognized manufacturer of new vehicles;

(2) Modified to the extent that the identity of the vehicle's make, model, or type is obscured by material changes in its appearance; or

(3) Modified by the removal, addition, alteration, or substitution of other than original replacement essential parts, including the vehicle's body, power train, steering system, suspension system, exhaust system, intake system, or bumper system; excluding ordinary body repair that does not change the exterior structure of the vehicle. The term does not include a special interest vehicle or a motorcycle.

Special interest vehicle: a vehicle of any age that, because of its significance, is being collected, preserved, restored, or maintained by a collector. The term includes a street rod vehicle and a street rod replica vehicle, as those terms are defined in section 286-26.5; a vehicle manufactured before 1968; and a vehicle manufactured after 1967 to resemble a vehicle manufactured before 1968.

Collector: an owner of one or more vehicles, including parts vehicles, who collects, purchases, acquires, trades, or disposes of a vehicle or its parts, for the owner's own use, to preserve, restore, and maintain the vehicle or another vehicle for hobby or historical purposes.

Parts vehicle: a vehicle that is owned by a collector to furnish parts for the restoration or maintenance of a special interest vehicle.

Street rod replica vehicle: a vehicle that was assembled from a manufactured kit, either as:

(1) A complete kit to construct a new vehicle consisting of a prefabricated body and chassis;

(2) Components manufactured before 1968; or

(3) Components manufactured after 1967 to resemble a vehicle manufactured before 1968;and that has been modified in its body style or design through the use of nonoriginal or reproduction components, such as the frame, engine, drive train, suspension, or brakes, in a manner that does not adversely affect its safe performance as a motor vehicle or render the vehicle unlawful for use on public highways.

Street rod vehicle: a vehicle that was:

(1) Manufactured before 1968; or

(2) Manufactured after 1967 to resemble a vehicle manufactured before 1968;

and that has been modified in its body style or design through the use of nonoriginal or reproduction components, such as the frame, engine, drive train, suspension, or brakes, in a manner that does not adversely affect its safe performance as a motor vehicle or render the vehicle unlawful for use on public highways. The term does not include a motorcycle, an antique vehicle, or a restored vehicle.

Modified vehicle kit: a package of components, other than original equipment or original equipment replacements, which when assembled becomes the major body assembly, or the major structural assembly, or both, used to construct or reconstruct a complete and operable vehicle.

Modified vehicle manufacturer: every person who manufactures or assembles two or more reconstructed vehicles having substantially the same design, construction, and equipment characteristics, and offers these vehicles for sale.

Modified vehicle kit manufacturer: every person who manufactures, distributes, offers for sale, or sells, a modified vehicle kit.

Hawaii Inoperable Vehicles: With the close of the 2006 legislative session, SAN beat back a Hawaii bill that provided for the removal and disposal of "derelict vehicles" from private property.

Hawaii Exhaust Noise: SAN-opposed legislation that sought to dramatically increase fines for those who violate the state's ban on the sale, installation and use of aftermarket exhaust systems died with the close of Hawaii's legislative session. Currently, Hawaii prohibits any exhaust system that increases "the noise emitted by a motor vehicle above that emitted by the vehicle as equipped from the factory. This law does not supply law enforcement with a clear standard to enforce, allowing them to make subjective judgments on whether or not a modified exhaust system is in violation.